Governor Moore expresses concerns about Baltimore bridge collapse’s significant effect on the national economy


Governor Moore expresses concerns about Baltimore bridge collapse’s significant effect on the national economy

Maryland Gov. Wes Moore (D) raised concerns about the collapse of the Francis Scott Key Bridge and its significant impact on the national economy during an interview on “Fox News Sunday”. He emphasized that the bridge collapse will not only affect Maryland but also have far-reaching consequences on the entire country, as the Port of Baltimore is one of the busiest ports in the United States, handling a large volume of cars, heavy trucks, and agricultural equipment.

Moore explained that the repercussions of the bridge collapse will be felt by people across different states, such as farmers in Kentucky, auto dealers in Ohio, and restaurants in Louisiana and Tennessee. He stressed the urgency of getting the Port of Baltimore operational again as it is crucial for the national economy.

The bridge collapsed after a cargo ship named Dali collided with it, causing it to crumble into the Patapsco River. The closure of the Port of Baltimore, a major shipping hub on the East Coast, has disrupted the flow of goods and affected thousands of jobs directly and indirectly related to port activities.

Despite the challenges, efforts to remove the wreckage from the bridge have begun, with crews starting a complex process to address the damage. There is no definite timeline for when the bridge will be rebuilt, but emergency funding of $60 million has already been provided by the Department of Transportation, with Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg indicating that additional funding will be made available.

Moore stressed that the support from federal agencies is not just for Maryland alone but for the national economy, which heavily relies on the operations of the Port of Baltimore. The impact of the bridge collapse goes beyond the state borders, prompting a coordinated response to address the situation and restore the flow of goods through the port.

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